skinnybonesxx:

Nom nom nom na We Heart It.

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Kate Moss photographiée par Nick Knight pour i-D Magazine

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vogue:

Festival Dressing 101: Put a hat on it.

Minnie Cushing photographed by Gianni Penati, Vogue, March 1, 1966

Find all of our lessons in festival dressing in the Vogue archives.

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ancientart:

Flake with drawing of Osiris seated on his throne within a shrine. Egyptian Ptolemaic Period, 305- 30 B.C.E.

Even if he were not labeled by the hieroglyphs at the right (“Osiris, the great god”), this deity would be easy to identify. Osiris, lord of the underworld, is always shown as a mummy, often wearing the White Crown of Upper Egypt adorned with two feathers of Ma’at (cosmic harmony). Here the god holds his characteristic crook and flail and is seated in a shrine or under a canopy.

Though the almond eye, long nose, and full lips suggest a New Kingdom date (Dynasties XVIII–XX, circa 1539–1070 B.C.), many other details indicate that the sketch was made in the Ptolemaic Period. The meticulous detail, manifest in the delineation of the ear, the eye, the plaited beard, the nostril, the thumbnails, and the feather pattern of the throne, is diagnostic for Egyptian drawing and relief of the fourth through first centuries B.C.

Courtesy of & currently located at the Brooklyn Museum, USA. Via their online collections. Accession Number: 37.52E.

""We fell in love, despite our differences, and once we did, something rare and beautiful was created. For me, love like that has only happened once, and that’s why every minute we spent together has been seared in my memory. I’ll never forget a single moment of it."
— Nicholas Sparks (The Notebook)"

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realizes:

♡personal/love♡

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embodyilluminati:

It is truly strange that people ask for proof concerning the possibility of a kind of transcendent knowledge instead of searching for it and verifying it for themselves by understanding the work necessary to acquire it.

- René Guénon